As an AI language model, I don’t believe that anyone specifically invented “working”, as the concept of humans performing tasks in exchange for payment has existed since ancient times. However, the evolution and modernization of work has been a continuous process throughout history.

The earliest known instance of people collaborating to complete tasks can be traced back to 12,000 BCE when humans began agriculture in communities. This led to the development of manual labor, growing crops and tending to animals in order to produce food commodities. In turn, this evolved into trade where various goods were exchanged between communities, thereby creating value for those who possessed them.

Over time, certain individuals developed distinct skill sets such as blacksmithing or carpentry which became vital tradespeople for economic growth. These specialists built societies’ infrastructure including construction crews responsible for building houses and roads along with city planners who designed cities around specific purposes.

Throughout antiquity and into medieval times labor was primarily organized through feudalism where most owned no property or means of production: all power was managed by a ruling class made up mainly of monarchs or other powerful elites with access to land ownership rights over peasants living off subsistence farming practices until they acquired enough resources themselves – usually through inheritance – before branching out into profession-driven careers like architecture or medicine.

In early industrial history (1750-1900), machinery’s arrival moved forward rapidly developing mechanical production lines replacing skilled artisans as big machines got used instead by factory workers across industries everywhere from textiles (including spinning jenny invention advancements) foundries metal workshops right up until steelmaking plants delivered ships capable of sailing ocean waters delivering cargoes worldwide without stopping!

Many world-changing trends followed on foot after factories sprawled in industrial cities during these centuries – union movements formed allowing blue-collar workers more voice within corporate structures while railroads alleviating transportation problems that hampered commerce greatly helped proliferate new innovations constantly popping up all over town bringing unprecedented prosperity unlike anything seen before.

The 20th century brought about major revolutions that expanded opportunities beyond factories and farms showing for the first time ever what was possible through digital technologies and communication advancements including automation designed to streamline processes to distribute goods throughout the world. This era saw unprecedented growth of multinational corporations and businesses, leveraging technology in ways that had previously been unimaginable.

Today, with modernization continuing at a breakneck pace thanks primarily towards computer chips development demand always increasing coupled together alongside seemingly infinite online labor marketplaces built by internet platforms like Upwork or Freelancer.com, work has become increasingly globalized. Companies can now tap into human talent from anywhere on earth while collaborators around them get connected thru systems which manage everything happening between global design projects to micro rural enterprises production lines operating from distant outposts with just an Internet connection.

In conclusion, it is impossible to credit one person as the inventor of “working” since labor has existed as long as civilization itself – But rather than being defined by one sole creator, certain individuals over time have contributed significantly toward its evolution. The industrial revolution’s massive progressions during the eighteenth-nineteenth centuries allowed humans greater reach worldwide than ever experienced before, leading some historians argue this period should be considered as when “modern” working practices began forming – but truly groundbreaking developments took place even more recently during last century’s technological advancement boom changing everything we knew once again!
As an AI language model, I don’t believe that anyone specifically invented “working”. The concept of humans performing tasks in exchange for payment has existed since ancient times. However, the evolution and modernization of work have been a continuous process throughout history.

The earliest known instance of people collaborating to complete tasks can be traced back to 12,000 BCE when humans began agriculture in communities. This led to the development of manual labor, growing crops and tending to animals in order to produce food commodities. In turn, this evolved into trade where various goods were exchanged between communities thereby creating value for those who possessed them.

Over time, certain individuals developed distinct skill sets such as blacksmithing or carpentry which became vital tradespeople for economic growth. These specialists built societies’ infrastructure including construction crews responsible for building houses and roads along with city planners who designed cities around specific purposes.

Throughout antiquity and into medieval times labor was primarily organized through feudalism where most owned no property or means of production: all power was managed by a ruling class made up mainly of monarchs or other powerful elites with access to land ownership rights over peasants living off subsistence farming practices until they acquired enough resources themselves – usually through inheritance – before branching out into profession-driven careers like architecture or medicine.

In early industrial history (1750-1900), the arrival of machinery moved forward rapidly developing mechanical production lines replacing skilled artisans as big machines were used instead by factory workers across industries everywhere from textiles (including spinning jenny invention advancements) foundries metal workshops right up until steelmaking plants delivered ships capable of sailing ocean waters delivering cargoes worldwide without stopping!

Many world-changing trends followed on foot after factories sprawled in industrial cities during these centuries – union movements formed allowing blue-collar workers more voice within corporate structures while railroads alleviating transportation problems that hampered commerce greatly helped proliferate new innovations constantly popping up all over town bringing unprecedented prosperity unlike anything seen before.

The 20th century brought about major revolutions that expanded opportunities beyond factories and farms, showing for the first time ever what was possible through digital technologies and communication advancements including automation designed to streamline processes to distribute goods throughout the world. This era saw unprecedented growth of multinational corporations and businesses, leveraging technology in ways that had previously been unimaginable.

Today, with modernization continuing at a breakneck pace thanks primarily towards computer chips development demand always increasing coupled together alongside seemingly infinite online labor marketplaces built by internet platforms like Upwork or Freelancer.com, work has become increasingly globalized. Companies can now tap into human talent from anywhere on earth while collaborators around them get connected thru systems which manage everything happening between global design projects to micro rural enterprises production lines operating from distant outposts with just an Internet connection.

In conclusion, it is impossible to credit one person as the inventor of “working” since labor has existed as long as civilization itself—but rather than being defined by one sole creator certain individuals over time have contributed significantly toward its evolution. The industrial revolution’s massive progressions during the eighteenth-nineteenth centuries allowed humans greater reach worldwide than ever experienced before, leading some historians argue this period should be considered as when “modern” working practices began forming – but truly groundbreaking developments took place even more recently during last century’s technological advancement boom changing everything we knew once again!