The high five is one of the most iconic and widely used gestures in modern times. It has been a part of our lives for so long that we don’t even think twice about it anymore. However, have you ever wondered who invented the high five?

It’s no secret that the sport of baseball has played a significant role in popularizing this celebratory gesture, but the exact origins are somewhat mysterious.

According to some sources, the first recorded instance of a high-five took place during a USC-USC game held on October 2, 1977. Glenn Burke, an outfielder for Los Angeles Dodgers at that time, was waiting at home plate when Dodger teammate Dusty Baker hit his 30th home run. Burke greeted him with what he called “the definitive handshake” – extending his arm towards Baker for a high-five.

Burke was openly gay and frequently found himself estranged from teammates and management as well as fodder for public mockery from fans across Major League Baseball. After being traded midway through ’79 season to Oakland Athletics – ironically one year before they swept into World Series greatness after beat L.A Dodgers – Burke’s career quickly ground to a halt; he refused assignments came back fighting after injuries until finally quitting professional sports altogether in 1980.

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However, there are different accounts regarding its invention throughout history.
“However, there are different accounts regarding its invention throughout history.”>

However, there are different accounts regarding its invention throughout history.

Some people believe it originated much earlier than this date while others maintain these claims remain purely anecdotal without concrete evidence citing their acceptance would only be speculation draw from mere hearsay rather than verifiable proof). Regardless of how accurate those stories may be though- given all legends often tied up facts – seems likely someone somewhere along the line threw out hand or arm outstretched following athletic success joyed by another individual too whom also responded similarly words other action rejoicing achievement meaning it can never definitively state when or where first “high five” occurred.

Another possible inventor is Derek Smith. He was a basketball player for the University of Louisville in the late 1970s. According to him, he invented the high five while playing with his teammates. During one game, Smith was struggling on defense, and his teammate Wiley Brown encouraged him by saying “slap me some skin.” Derek then slapped Brown’s hand as if giving him a high five. The gesture caught on quickly among their team and soon spread across college athletics.

Another contender for the title of inventor is Magic Johnson, who claims that he created this iconic move when he played for Michigan State University in 1978. He came up with it after seeing a character do it in the movie The Bad News Bears.

However, there’s also evidence that suggests that other sports played an integral role in bringing the high five into mainstream culture. For example foot slapping previously seen among American Football counterparts just over decade earlier during wave enthusiastic greeting crowned touchdowners successful moment along field progression well elicits feelings fervent satisfaction proved appealing return victory still holds relevance today despite appearing less frequently given diverse wide array post-scoring action creative devises ensuing popularity throughout sporting world exemplified incredible staying power recognised worldwide regarded ubiquitous symbol jubilation camaraderie passion exhibited athletes competitors alike from varying walks life

In conclusion, while we may never know precisely who first invented the high-five pre date back to Ancient Roman’s pleasure not everyone can draw upon eternal summit celebrating tremendous accomplishment signalling achievement friends colleagues group around something meaningful rooted experience expression joy perseverance hard work accepting such sport person own unique way never been more relevant than right here – reaching out towards others through simple gestures has always had powerful resonance positivity transcending time place culture universally beloved form nonverbal communication often linked enhancing social connection sense shared purpose morale-building whether interpreted sign gratitude appreciation or triumph people have come appreciate how active physical engagement tangible brings depth human interaction so rather enjoy all those moments grit determination witness finesse skill mere physical prowess display strive replicate at many opportunities possible today!
The high-five is one of the most iconic and widely used gestures in modern times. It has been a part of our lives for so long that we don’t even think twice about it anymore. However, have you ever wondered who invented the high five?

It’s no secret that the sport of baseball has played a significant role in popularizing this celebratory gesture, but the exact origins are somewhat mysterious.

According to some sources, the first recorded instance of a high-five took place during a USC-USC game held on October 2, 1977. Glenn Burke, an outfielder for Los Angeles Dodgers at that time, was waiting at home plate when Dodger teammate Dusty Baker hit his 30th home run. Burke greeted him with what he called “the definitive handshake” – extending his arm towards Baker for a high-five.

Burke was openly gay and frequently found himself estranged from teammates and management as well as fodder for public mockery from fans across Major League Baseball. After being traded midway through ’79 season to Oakland Athletics – ironically one year before they swept into World Series greatness after beat L.A Dodgers – Burke’s career quickly ground to a halt; he refused assignments came back fighting after injuries until finally quitting professional sports altogether in 1980.

However, there are different accounts regarding its invention throughout history.

Some people believe it originated much earlier than this date while others maintain these claims remain purely anecdotal without concrete evidence citing their acceptance would only be speculation draw from mere hearsay rather than verifiable proof). Regardless of how accurate those stories may be though- given all legends often tied up facts – seems likely someone somewhere along the line threw out hand or arm outstretched following athletic success joyed by another individual too whom also responded similarly words other action rejoicing achievement meaning it can never definitively state when or where first “high five” occurred.

Another possible inventor is Derek Smith. He was a basketball player for the University of Louisville in the late 1970s. According to him, he invented the high five while playing with his teammates. During one game, Smith was struggling on defense, and his teammate Wiley Brown encouraged him by saying “slap me some skin.” Derek then slapped Brown’s hand as if giving him a high five. The gesture caught on quickly among their team and soon spread across college athletics.

Another contender for the title of inventor is Magic Johnson, who claims that he created this iconic move when he played for Michigan State University in 1978. He came up with it after seeing a character do it in the movie The Bad News Bears.

However, there’s also evidence that suggests that other sports played an integral role in bringing the high five into mainstream culture. For example foot slapping previously seen among American Football counterparts just over decade earlier during wave enthusiastic greeting crowned touchdowners successful moment along field progression well elicits feelings fervent satisfaction proved appealing return victory still holds relevance today despite appearing less frequently given diverse wide array post-scoring action creative devises ensuing popularity throughout sporting world exemplified incredible staying power recognised worldwide regarded ubiquitous symbol jubilation camaraderie passion exhibited athletes competitors alike from varying walks life

In conclusion, while we may never know precisely who first invented the high-five pre date back to Ancient Roman’s pleasure not everyone can draw upon eternal summit celebrating tremendous accomplishment signalling achievement friends colleagues group around something meaningful rooted experience expression joy perseverance hard work accepting such sport person own unique way never been more relevant than right here – reaching out towards others through simple gestures has always had powerful resonance positivity transcending time place culture universally beloved form nonverbal communication often linked enhancing social connection sense shared purpose morale-building whether interpreted sign gratitude appreciation or triumph people have come appreciate how active physical engagement tangible brings depth human interaction so rather enjoy all those moments grit determination witness finesse skill mere physical prowess display strive replicate at many opportunities possible today!”