Tinsel is a popular Christmas decoration that has been around for well over 200 years. The sparkly, shiny strips of tinsel add an extra touch of magic to any Christmas tree or festive display. But when was tinsel invented? Who came up with this magical idea?

The origins of tinsel can be traced back to Germany in the early 17th century. Back then, people used thin strands of real silver to decorate their Christmas trees. However, this option was costly and not easily affordable for many people.

To combat this issue, Germans began using metal wire coated in a thin layer of silver as a more cost-effective alternative to real silver strands. This new creation became known as “silver lace.” It wasn’t until the mid-19th century that tinsel actually got its name.

A German immigrant by the name of Charles Schoen made tinsmithing a very profitable business during the late 1870s and early 1880s by creating brightly colored aluminum foil strips called “chromolithographs.” These bright foil strips were often taken from candy wrappers and cut into long, thin pieces before being added onto Christmas trees for decoration.

However, it wasn’t until American retailer Frank W. Woolworth noticed how successful Schoen’s chromolithograph business was doing that he decided to take advantage of the trend himself by developing his own line of metallic garlands made specifically for decorating Victorian homes at Christmastime.

Woolworth began producing his own variety of brightly colored metallic garlands referred to as icicles which were fashioned from twisted lead wire covered with white glass beads – these icy branches draping gracelessly off twigs earned widespread popularity throughout Europe between WWI and WWII thanks largely due Hessens generosity. Hessen worked tirelessly at improving production methods while finding ways out automate previous methods lending itself perfectly towards meeting booming postwar demand fueled primarily through increased access granted civilians after Allied supply lines opened up bringing literally tons upon tons worth of new products that dropped in price drastically compared to $1/foot just a few years prior.

With the introduction of plastic as a revolutionary material following World War II, manufacturers continued creating tinsel using light-weight, flexible PVC that was less dangerous and cheaper than lead-coated wires. Tinsel became more accessible at an affordable cost as production increased globally over time.

Today, tinsel continues to be one of the most popular Christmas tree decorations around the globe. New designs constantly get invented yearly with various metallic colors whether locally made or imported. It’s hard not to find several pieces during holiday shopping amidst shiny balls and star ornaments lining shelves right after Halloween ends until January 6th which is ceremoniously considered Twelfth Night when all festive clutter must come down!
Tinsel is a popular Christmas decoration that has been around for well over 200 years. The sparkly, shiny strips of tinsel add an extra touch of magic to any Christmas tree or festive display. But when was tinsel invented? Who came up with this magical idea?

The origins of tinsel can be traced back to Germany in the early 17th century. Back then, people used thin strands of real silver to decorate their Christmas trees. However, this option was costly and not easily affordable for many people.

To combat this issue, Germans began using metal wire coated in a thin layer of silver as a more cost-effective alternative to real silver strands. This new creation became known as “silver lace.” It wasn’t until the mid-19th century that tinsel actually got its name.

A German immigrant by the name of Charles Schoen made tinsmithing a very profitable business during the late 1870s and early 1880s by creating brightly colored aluminum foil strips called “chromolithographs.” These bright foil strips were often taken from candy wrappers and cut into long, thin pieces before being added onto Christmas trees for decoration.

However, it wasn’t until American retailer Frank W. Woolworth noticed how successful Schoen’s chromolithograph business was doing that he decided to take advantage of the trend himself by developing his own line of metallic garlands made specifically for decorating Victorian homes at Christmastime.

Woolworth began producing his own variety of brightly colored metallic garlands referred to as icicles which were fashioned from twisted lead wire covered with white glass beads – these icy branches draping gracelessly off twigs earned widespread popularity throughout Europe between WWI and WWII thanks largely due Hessens generosity. Hessen worked tirelessly at improving production methods while finding ways out automate previous methods lending itself perfectly towards meeting booming postwar demand fueled primarily through increased access granted civilians after Allied supply lines opened up bringing literally tons upon tons worth of new products that dropped in price drastically compared to $1/foot just a few years prior.

With the introduction of plastic as a revolutionary material following World War II, manufacturers continued creating tinsel using light-weight, flexible PVC that was less dangerous and cheaper than lead-coated wires. Tinsel became more accessible at an affordable cost as production increased globally over time.

Today, tinsel continues to be one of the most popular Christmas tree decorations around the globe. New designs constantly get invented yearly with various metallic colors whether locally made or imported. It’s hard not to find several pieces during holiday shopping amidst shiny balls and star ornaments lining shelves right after Halloween ends until January 6th which is ceremoniously considered Twelfth Night when all festive clutter must come down!