The X-Files is a popular science fiction television series that gained immense popularity during its original run from 1993 to 2002. The show has since been revived twice, with additional seasons airing in both 2016 and 2018. In addition to the TV series, there are also two movies which follow the adventures of FBI agents Mulder and Scully. The first movie, simply titled ‘The X-Files’, was released in 1998 and the second movie – ‘The X-Files: I Want to Believe’ – was released ten years later in 2008.

For fans of the show who are looking for advice on when to watch these two movies, we’ve got you covered. Read on for our expert guide on when best to enjoy these two cinematic adventures featuring one of TV’s most iconic detective duos.

If you're new to The X- Files

If you’re new to The X- Files

A good starting point for watching either The X-Files as a whole or just its accompanying films would be after completing the first five or six seasons of the show. As it often occurs within many long-running shows (including this one), characters and settings are introduced early-on making previous knowledge an important component if you want everything fully contextualized.

In particular, it’s essential that viewers familiarize themselves with characters such as Agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully—the primary protagonists throughout both films—as well as some not-as-crucial side players like Agent Skinner—Mulder’s boss—and Cigarette Smoking Man—a secretive man intertwined with key events involving Mulder’s beloved sister Samantha.

If you're already familiar with the entirety of the original television series

If you’re already familiar with the entirety of the original television series

While longtime fans may have preferred watching each film immediately following their respective season releases—more contextually catching up thematically—it makes practical sense too since going this route allows audiences a chance to react more viscerally with Anasazi-heavy mythology episodes influencing plenty concerning convoluted narrative arcs initiated in the show’s earliest years.

For a lot of fans, this could serve as something of an extended season nine; and refreshingly—one with fewer standalone Monster Episodes to dilute that hardcore fan-candy.

While both films are connected in some ways—primarily Mulder and Scully specifically trying to locate alien vessels or uncover the secrets behind government cover-ups getting neatly tied together across two hours—it broadly doesn’t matter which comes first if you’re up-to-speed about everything The X-Files has already established over its nine year run particularly previous attempts at feature leanings shared by those mythology episodes throughout earlier seasons.

If it’s been ages since you’ve watched any X-Files

There are many fans who have fond memories of enjoying The X-Files during its original run but haven’t revisited the series since it wrapped up almost twenty years ago. In this case when watching these fims, one cannot blame themselves for forgetting some key storylines or episode details.Memories can be fuzzy even with generally stellar memory banks so here’s our tip: maybe take it slow initially—a rewatch is advised given how difficult all early mythos installments were complicated enough not to mention how steeped-in-texture most standalone “monster-of-the-week” episodes remain. This can provide newbies and die-hards alike plenty more opportunity toward examining character dynamics intermittently sprinkled in between each monster-centric adventure.

The point would be to achieve maximum context willingly accessible whilst never forcing viewers into retreading much familiar territory perhaps changing pace at regular intervals causing reviews post-movie-watch-ups feeling fresher appraisals entirely once either installment concludes.

Conclusion:

With careful consideration on just exactly what type of X-phile you might decide yourself being (a newbie entranced by the reboot, someone re-discovering archives long forgotten, or merely longtime supporter searching for fresh content), there isn’t really a true “perfect” time to watch The X-Files movies.

However, we advise a broad guide that may enable seamless motions drawing attention away from irrelevant plot points towards intense storyline, rather than getting caught up within convoluted mythologies. As previously hinted though —the best overall advice deliberately taking the task slow with ample pauses for reflective thought and analysis may help new conversations and appreciations among online or other X-phile communities.
The X-Files – TV Series and Movies

The X-Files is a popular science fiction television series that gained immense popularity during its original run from 1993 to 2002. The show has since been revived twice, with additional seasons airing in both 2016 and 2018. In addition to the TV series, there are also two movies which follow the adventures of FBI agents Mulder and Scully.

If you’re new to The X- Files:

A good starting point for watching either The X-Files as a whole or just its accompanying films would be after completing the first five or six seasons of the show. As it often occurs within many long-running shows (including this one), characters and settings are introduced early-on making previous knowledge an important component if you want everything fully contextualized.

In particular, it’s essential that viewers familiarize themselves with characters such as Agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully—the primary protagonists throughout both films—as well as some not-as-crucial side players like Agent Skinner—Mulder’s boss—and Cigarette Smoking Man—a secretive man intertwined with key events involving Mulder’s beloved sister Samantha.

If you’re already familiar with the entirety of the original television series:

While longtime fans may have preferred watching each film immediately following their respective season releases—more contextually catching up thematically—it makes practical sense too since going this route allows audiences a chance to react more viscerally with Anasazi-heavy mythology episodes influencing plenty concerning convoluted narrative arcs initiated in the show’s earliest years.

For a lot of fans, this could serve as something of an extended season nine; and refreshingly—one with fewer standalone Monster Episodes to dilute that hardcore fan-candy. While both films are connected in some ways—primarily Mulder and Scully specifically trying to locate alien vessels or uncovering secrets behind government cover-ups getting neatly tied together across two hours—it broadly doesn’t matter which comes first if you’re up-to-speed about everything The X-Files has already established over its nine-year run, particularly previous attempts at feature leanings shared by those mythology episodes throughout earlier seasons.

If it’s been ages since you’ve watched any X-Files:

There are many fans who have fond memories of enjoying The X-Files during its original run but haven’t revisited the series since it wrapped up almost twenty years ago. In this case when watching these films, one cannot blame themselves for forgetting some key storylines or episode details. Memories can be fuzzy even with generally stellar memory banks; so here’s our tip: maybe take it slow initially—a rewatch is advised given how difficult all early mythos installments were complicated enough not to mention how steeped-in-texture most standalone “monster-of-the-week” episodes remain. This can provide newbies and die-hards alike plenty more opportunity toward examining character dynamics intermittently sprinkled in between each monster-centric adventure.

The point would be to achieve maximum context willingly accessible whilst never forcing viewers into retreading much familiar territory perhaps changing pace at regular intervals causing reviews post-movie-watch-ups feeling fresher appraisals entirely once either installment concludes.

Conclusion:

With careful consideration on just exactly what type of X-phile you might decide yourself being (a newbie entranced by the reboot, someone rediscovering archives long forgotten or merely a longtime supporter searching for fresh content), there isn’t really a true “perfect” time to watch The X-Files movies. However, we advise a broad guide that may enable seamless motions drawing attention away from irrelevant plot points towards intense storyline rather than getting caught up within convoluted mythologies. As previously hinted though —the best overall advice deliberately taking the task slow with ample pauses for reflective thought and analysis may help new conversations and appreciations among online or other X-phile communities.”