Pizza is undoubtedly one of the most popular foods worldwide. This crispy crust topped with tomato sauce, cheese and a variety of toppings has taken over the world and become a staple in many households. However, there have been claims that pizza was not actually invented in Italy as commonly believed, but instead originated in China.

The idea that pizza may have come from China isn’t new: it’s an ancient controversy about any food item that was independently developed across different cultures around the globe. Interestingly enough, this claim can be traced back to Marco Polo—one of the first European explorers into China—when he documented his travels along historical trade routes during 12th century CE until both Chinese and Italian traders traded spices amongst themselves. He spoke about how mixing flour with water produces flatbread-like products which were eaten by people in eastern countries like Persia or India. These dishes were similar locally made bread called nan—the precursor to modern-day naan.

It wasn’t just Marco Polo who observed these flatbreads; even earlier travelers also mentioned something quite similar when they came into contact with different cuisines abroad. Central Asia reportedly had several iterations on unleavened breads too—as seen within India nowadays—and after gaining popularity among nomadic Genghis Khan’s soldiers all over Mongolia before reaching Northern Europe. All those following encounters led to an eclectic arrangement of food ideas that created what we generally think of as pizza today.

Returning to Marco Polo’s account specifically, he supposedly found evidence from observing Mongolian warriors making cribs with leather saddles placed atop steaming hot slabs heated by fire beneath them! Then some types raised each fiber up so well-informed bakers could check for ascot-air pockets indicating readiness (this sounds quite convoluted…but stay tuned!). It seems likely differing groups’ cooking techniques influenced medieval European bakers who would adapt various pills throughout time eventually resulting in modern finished product-pizza!

There are other accounts of Chinese flatbreads being similar to Italian pizza. The book “On Food and Cooking” by Harold McGee mentions a type of flatbread that is cut into slices and most often prepared with tomato sauce called cong you bing, which literally means “scallion pancake,” but has been translated into western languages as “Chinese pizza.” However, there are some significant differences between what we know as pizza and this traditional Chinese dish.

For one thing, the toppings on cong you bing are much simpler than those on modern-day pizzas. They usually consist of scallions or onions with soybean oil, while today’s pizzas feature an array of meats, veggies and cheeses. Additionally, the cheese traditionally used in Italian-style pizza–mozzarella—does not have any equivalent in China or avoid dairy products like Lactose intolerant population in Southeast Asia who may substitute it for vegan-type solutions instead using shredded tofu instead!

Another point to consider is that even though Marco Polo witnessed some similarities between Mongolian cribs’ bread-making technique method back then still wildly differs from how Neapolitan- style pizzas were first made centuries after his observations by spreading fresh locally-sourced ingredients over soft yeast-risen dough and cooked inside wood-fired ovens at high temperatures for around 90 seconds (or less).

However despite these differing features modern-day versions developed independently across numerous cultures worldwide–the notion remains debatable whether Italy had enough points to claim themselves authors behind credited creation considering such strong East-to-West interactions throughout human history! Nevertheless different shapes & sizes concepts sure abound when observing global foodways alongside lingual translations/mistranslations altering definitions thereof time again eventually leading people reinterpreting their own cultural heritage well beyond original locals’ remaining frame-of-reference ever anticipated…as always happening as food gets ‘served-up’ every day somewhere anew!

In conclusion, while it cannot be definitively proven whether China invented pizza or not, it’s clear that Italian-style pizza as we know it today was heavily influenced by Mediterranean culinary traditions dating back centuries. The different regional adaptations only further prove how this food has become an international favorite. In the end–regardless of who can claim credit for its invention–pizza remains a beloved dish enjoyed by millions all over the world. And if China did indeed contribute to its creation, then perhaps we should all be grateful for their culinary heritage!
Pizza is undoubtedly one of the most popular foods worldwide. This crispy crust topped with tomato sauce, cheese and a variety of toppings has taken over the world and become a staple in many households. However, there have been claims that pizza was not actually invented in Italy as commonly believed, but instead originated in China.

The idea that pizza may have come from China isn’t new: it’s an ancient controversy about any food item that was independently developed across different cultures around the globe. Interestingly enough, this claim can be traced back to Marco Polo—one of the first European explorers into China—when he documented his travels along historical trade routes during 12th century CE until both Chinese and Italian traders traded spices amongst themselves.

He spoke about how mixing flour with water produces flatbread-like products which were eaten by people in eastern countries like Persia or India. These dishes were similar locally made bread called nan—the precursor to modern-day naan. It wasn’t just Marco Polo who observed these flatbreads; even earlier travelers also mentioned something quite similar when they came into contact with different cuisines abroad.

Central Asia reportedly had several iterations on unleavened breads too—as seen within India nowadays—and after gaining popularity among nomadic Genghis Khan’s soldiers all over Mongolia before reaching Northern Europe. All those following encounters led to an eclectic arrangement of food ideas that created what we generally think of as pizza today.

Returning to Marco Polo’s account specifically, he supposedly found evidence from observing Mongolian warriors making cribs with leather saddles placed atop steaming hot slabs heated by fire beneath them! Then some types raised each fiber up so well-informed bakers could check for ascot-air pockets indicating readiness (this sounds quite convoluted…but stay tuned!). It seems likely differing groups’ cooking techniques influenced medieval European bakers who would adapt various pills throughout time eventually resulting in modern finished product-pizza!

There are other accounts of Chinese flatbreads being similar to Italian pizza. The book “On Food and Cooking” by Harold McGee mentions a type of flatbread that is cut into slices and most often prepared with tomato sauce called cong you bing, which literally means “scallion pancake,” but has been translated into western languages as “Chinese pizza.” However, there are some significant differences between what we know as pizza and this traditional Chinese dish.

For one thing, the toppings on cong you bing are much simpler than those on modern-day pizzas. They usually consist of scallions or onions with soybean oil, while today’s pizzas feature an array of meats, veggies and cheeses. Additionally, the cheese traditionally used in Italian-style pizza–mozzarella—does not have any equivalent in China or avoid dairy products like Lactose intolerant population in Southeast Asia who may substitute it for vegan-type solutions instead using shredded tofu instead!

Another point to consider is that even though Marco Polo witnessed some similarities between Mongolian cribs’ bread-making technique method back then still wildly differs from how Neapolitan- style pizzas were first made centuries after his observations by spreading fresh locally-sourced ingredients over soft yeast-risen dough and cooked inside wood-fired ovens at high temperatures for around 90 seconds (or less).

However despite these differing features modern-day versions developed independently across numerous cultures worldwide–the notion remains debatable whether Italy had enough points to claim themselves authors behind credited creation considering such strong East-to-West interactions throughout human history! Nevertheless different shapes & sizes concepts sure abound when observing global foodways alongside lingual translations/mistranslations altering definitions thereof time again eventually leading people reinterpreting their own cultural heritage well beyond original locals’ remaining frame-of-reference ever anticipated…as always happening as food gets ‘served-up’ every day somewhere anew!

In conclusion, while it cannot be definitively proven whether China invented pizza or not, it’s clear that Italian-style pizza as we know it today was heavily influenced by Mediterranean culinary traditions dating back centuries. The different regional adaptations only further prove how this food has become an international favorite. In the end–regardless of who can claim credit for its invention–pizza remains a beloved dish enjoyed by millions all over the world. And if China did indeed contribute to its creation, then perhaps we should all be grateful for their culinary heritage!