As the National Hockey League (NHL) has grown in popularity over the years, so too have the salaries of its officials. A job as an NHL referee or linesman can be lucrative and rewarding, but it also requires a significant amount of training and skill.

How much do NHL referees make?

How much do NHL referees make?

According to a Business Insider report from 2020, NHL refs earn between $1,600 and $3,900 per game. The average salary for an NHL official is roughly $187,000 per year. This pales in comparison to what some of the league’s top players make – for example, Connor McDavid of the Edmonton Oilers makes nearly $13 million per year – but it is still a fairly substantial sum.

It should be noted that these figures are only estimates based on public data and may not reflect actual salaries or bonuses paid to individual officials.

Referees versus linesmen

Referees versus linesmen

It’s important to note that there are two types of officials in an NHL game: referees and linesmen. Referees are responsible for enforcing rules such as penalties and misconducts; they typically wear black-and-white striped jerseys with numbers on their backs. Linesmen are responsible for calling offside violations (when players cross the blue line into their opponent’s zone before the puck), icings (when a player shoots the puck past both goal lines without being touched by another player), icing touches (when defensive teams need to get back possession after hitting an offensive team member’s stick), faceoffs at center ice during games where one team has been called for icing or taking care of fights when they break out; they typically wear orange armbands over their regular striped jerseys.

Both referees and linesmen must complete extensive training before qualifying for employment by the NHL. They must pass written tests covering rules and regulations governing play in professional hockey, perform physical fitness evaluations showing that they’re capable of keeping up with fast-paced skaters during games and exhibit appropriate, professional demeanor while working in stressful environments.

Travel requirements

One of the perks – or drawbacks, depending on your perspective – of being an NHL official is that they must travel extensively during the season. No matter which team they are assigned to work with, linesmen and referees must be prepared to hit the road for a significant portion of each year. This can be especially taxing on family members at home but it also provides opportunities for more lucrative assignments such as playoff games.

Referees may be given assignments based on their familiarity with specific teams or geographic locations; for example, an official from Canada might have more experience dealing with high-intensity hockey in colder climates than someone who usually works closer to the equator. Linesmen generally make less per game than referees since most of their tasks revolve around keeping play inbounds rather than calling penalties; however, steady work combined with salary supplements and bonuses mean they also enjoy a comfortable lifestyle compared to other professions out there.

In contrast to players’ salaries which are often publicized far and wide thanks to various reports about earnings potential (and greed!), officials’ pay has mostly remained out of sight so it’s difficult knowing exactly how much any given referee makes these days beyond general statements made by people involved like commentators broadcasts/networks producers etcetera.

Why become an NHL referee?

Despite its challenges – including heavy travel schedules that keep many refs away from loved ones for extended periods – becoming an NHL Official is still incredibly appealing option for those who are both passionate about hockey and driven by making a difference through fair play policing even if mainly within rules & guidelines created by the league itself.

Some former players become referees after retiring from active competition since they can no longer compete due to age/health constraints. Others choose refereeing because it gives them space used before diving all-in into coaching positions where coaches act more as mentors instead mentor-mentee relationships likely stem up among officials too who form a tight group that tend to support another across seasons or even go out for dinner and drinks together after games.

Summary

NHL referees are an essential part of the game, ensuring fair play and enforcing rules that keep teams on an even playing field. Although their salaries may not be as high as those of top players in the league, most refs enjoy comfortable lifestyles thanks to steady work and bonuses for assignments such as playoff games. If you’re passionate about hockey, have excellent physical fitness and mental stamina coupled with ability to communicate well amidst stressful situations then becoming an NHL official could definitely be within reach provided you are willing put big effort into it!
As the National Hockey League (NHL) has grown in popularity over the years, so too have the salaries of its officials. A job as an NHL referee or linesman can be lucrative and rewarding, but it also requires a significant amount of training and skill.

According to Business Insider’s 2020 report, NHL refs earn between $1,600 and $3,900 per game while the average salary for an NHL official is around $187,000 annually. Although players’ earnings are often made public due to various reports about potential greed – officials’ pay usually remains out of sight.

There are two types of officials on an NHL game: referees and linesmen. Referees enforce rules such as penalties while linesmen call offside violations, icings among others. Both referees and linesmen must complete extensive training before being employed by the NHL which includes written tests that cover rules & regulations governing play in professional hockey, physical fitness evaluations showing they’re capable of keeping up with fast-paced skaters during games plus exhibiting appropriate professional demeanor while working amidst stressful environments.

One drawback – or perk depending on your perspective –of being an NHL official is that they must travel extensively during the season no matter which team they work with making family life challenging despite more lucrative assignments potentially like playoff games.

In contrast to players’ salaries which are often publicized far and wide thanks to various reports about earnings potential (and greed!), officials’ pay has mostly remained elusive beyond general statements made by people involved like commentators broadcasts/networks producers etcetera.

Becoming an NHL Official is still incredibly appealing option particularly if passionate about hockey as refs ensure fair play through rule enforcement; although it might require considerable effort put into building up oneself physically fit mentally sharp especially when communicating amidst stressful situations — athletes could become one after retiring from active competition since age/health constraints make competing impossible at times resulting into investing their dreams toward becoming part-time monitors/mechanisms responsible for game administering services instead.