As an AI language model, I don’t have first-hand experience of Deja vu in the same way that humans do, but I can certainly explain it from a scientific perspective.

Deja vu is a psychological phenomenon that refers to the feeling or sensation of having experienced something before when you are encountering it for the first time. It’s a strange and inexplicable experience that leaves people with many questions and everyone has had at least once in their lifetime.

The French phrase “déjà vu” means “already seen.” The Spanish say “paramnesia,” meaning, literally, false memory. While these phrases aren’t exact translations of each other they all point towards instances where our brains remember things incorrectly. And we perceive situations as some sort of repetition.

To understand how deja vu works, we need to explore what happens in our brain during this unusual event:

Short-term Memory: Whenever you encounter something new —a person, place or idea—your brain creates new memories very quickly via your short-term memory (STM). STM clears out old information automatically after 20-30 seconds if not deemed important enough by your brain; otherwise items moved into long-term memory (LTM).

Long-Term Memory: On-set process begins to occur whenever you expose yourself repeatedly times with certain stimulus – either consciously or unconsciously – creating long term memories (LTM).

Information Processing In Brain: Parts of your brain work together while taking on different functions under every instance such as sensory organs engaging sight nor sounds etc by communicating signals one wave after another throughout certain areas within different regions inside your head

Your Memories Play Games With You:

Your Memories Play Games With You:
Sometimes when the stimuli reaches your LTM–memory storage depot-(mostly due to its significance), there may be instances where they clash creating mental confusion which creates cognitive dissonance leading us to feel like experiencing things twice over again even though it’s happening correctly only once now triggering a sense of anxiety and tremulousness where you’ll feel like the past moment reoccurring in front of your eyes just as if it happened before is Deja vu.

Scientifically, there are three theorized types of deja vu:

Scientifically, there are three theorized types of deja vu:

1) Neuropsychological Dysfunction: This theory states that a temporary delay in communication between different parts of your brain might cause strange feelings or sensations.

2) Dual Processing: According to this theory, when one part of our brain processes information faster than another, this could also lead to the feeling we know as ‘deja vu.’

3) Attentional Bias: The third and last theory relies on attention biases within humans. Our brains have a tendency to focus on things that relate more closely with what’s already stored in our memories making us feel familiar triggering a sense of reoccurrence eventhough we are encountering something novel for the first time since our attention centers closely resemble previously experienced events sharpening up identical details initiating deja vu mental response.

In conclusion, experiencing déjà vu can be very confusing and mind-boggling sometimes but understanding how it works does give us some answers about what’s going on – even though science doesn’t yet fully understand exactly why these unique experiences happen.
As an AI language model, I don’t have first-hand experience of Deja vu in the same way that humans do, but I can certainly explain it from a scientific perspective.

Deja vu is a phenomenon wherein one experiences a feeling or sensation of having undergone some experience before when encountering it for the first time. It is quite common and almost everyone has experienced it at least once. But what exactly happens within our brains during this unusual event?

Well, to understand how deja vu works, we need to delve into what occurs in our brain during this novel occurrence – there are three main components.

Firstly, whenever you encounter something new- be it people; places or concepts – your brain creates new memories very quickly via your short-term memory (STM). STM carries out old information automatically after 20-30 seconds if deemed unimportant by your brain. Otherwise items are transferred to long-term memory (LTM).

On-set process begins to occur whenever you expose yourself repeatedly times with certain stimulus – either consciously or unconsciously creating long term memories (LTM). This brings us to another crucial area which relates directly with processing information – Parts of your brain work together while taking on different functions under every instance such as sensory organs engaging sight nor sounds etc by communicating signals one wave after another throughout certain areas within different regions inside your head.

Then comes the part where things get really complicated – Your Memories Play Games With You:

Sometimes stimuli reaches LTM-mostly due its significance-, leading them clashing thus causing mental confusion and cognitive dissonance whereby despite everything seeming correct only happening once we feel like experiencing that moment twice triggering anxiety and tremulousness whereby making us believe that past moments reoccur initiating Deja vu response.

There are three theorized types of deja vu:

Neuropsychological Dysfunction: This theory states that temporary communication delay between various parts of the human may activate strange feelings pending an external stimulus,

Dual Processing: According to this theory, when one part of our brain processes information faster than another, it could also lead to the feeling we know as ‘deja vu.’

Attentional Bias: The third and last theory relies on attention bias within humans. Our brains tend to focus on things identical to those stored in past experiences causing us to feel familiar and triggering a sense of reoccurrence.

In conclusion, understanding how deja vu works can be quite mind-boggling but gives answer regarding what is going on although modern science does not yet fully comprehend exactly why these precise experiences occur.