Realism is defined as a literary and artistic movement that emerged in Europe during the 19th century. It was characterized by its attempt to capture reality by depicting people, events, and objects as they are rather than through idealization or romanticism. Realism reflected the culture of the industrial age because it arose in response to the social, economic, and cultural changes brought about by industrialization.

The Industrial Revolution had reshaped traditional societies of agrarian economies into urban centers of factories and mass production. With industrialization came new technologies like steam engines, railroads, telegraphs which were able to transport goods across longer distances more efficiently than ever before. These advancements had begun changing peoples lives into something more demanding on money since everything could be transported easily from one place to another.

The realist movement sought to document these sweeping changes in society. Writers such as Charles Dickens and Emile Zola wrote novels showing how poverty-stricken individuals struggled against a capitalist system that valued profits over humanity. They documented factory workers’ conditions where there was not enough light for them to read at night beside working heavy machines with no safety protections.

Visual artists also began emphasizing realism in their work., John Constable’s landscapes featured rural scenes that were gradually disappearing under rapid urbanization; Gustave Courbet painted portraits of ordinary people instead of just nobles or aristocrats which became a trend among other painters too.

In literature Realists opposed Romanticism’s emphasis on individual imagination opting instead for an emphasis on scientific observation towards reality itself unlike romantic poetry which often emphasized emotions rather than specific events

Realism emerged soon after political revolutions ended nearly a century-long struggle against monarchies throughout Europe while taking advantage upon newly established freedoms granted post-revolutionary stability allowed artist’s creative destinies flourish without fear repercussions felt under strict censorship laws set up beforehand

For example: The rise of photography seen during this time period both contributed greatly whilst problematical simultaneously in regards goals. With photography, accurate shots capturing something exactly as it looks on a silver print eventually allowed more forthcoming reference material for artists’ studios and workshops while causing challenges to painters striving to balance their original visions being replicated with photorealism eerily realistic depictions.

Realists worked hard capturing subjects that accurately understood the conditions of the working class in society to act as an unapologetic protest against capitalism’s increasingly evident exploitation of people laboring away at factories. They paid attention towards showing poverty-stricken homes, inadequate living circumstances experienced by families barely getting through each day which was a reality for some who thought they could find improvements post-revolutionary years

In conclusion, realism reflected the culture of industrial age because it is intrinsically linked with changes brought about by industrialization; adapting social conventions from pre-20th century into contemporary spaces resonating still today although its popularity waned over time amidst technological shifts and pop art movements allowing fresh ideas/voices be recognized equally within our current society’s various conversations. It truly did capture what we may have resented toward modernist artworks such as impressionism would not articulate: The authenticity lost under mass-consumption culture overrun by machines outpacing human life quality in efforts towards profit above caring for those struggling economically all around us despite technology’s accomplishments through efficiency sometimes valued more than humanity itself.”
Realism, a literary and artistic movement that emerged in Europe during the 19th century, sought to capture reality by depicting people, events, and objects as they are rather than through idealization or romanticism. Realism reflected the culture of the industrial age because it arose in response to the social, economic, and cultural changes brought about by industrialization.

The Industrial Revolution had reshaped traditional societies of agrarian economies into urban centers of factories and mass production. With industrialization came new technologies like steam engines, railroads, telegraphs which were able to transport goods across longer distances more efficiently than ever before. These advancements had begun changing peoples lives into something more demanding on money since everything could be transported easily from one place to another.

As society changed rapidly due to technological advancements in every aspect of daily life for people living under capitalist conditions – writers such as Charles Dickens and Emile Zola wrote novels showing how poverty-stricken individuals struggled against a system that valued profits over humanity. Writers wanted readers to understand how hard factory workers’ conditions were where there was not enough light for them to read at night beside working heavy machines with no safety protections.

Visual artists also began emphasizing realism in their work when painters like Gustave Courbet painted portraits featuring ordinary people instead of just nobles or aristocrats who traditionally dominated portraiture art pieces meanwhile John Constable emphasized landscapes depicting rural scenes which were disappearing gradually under rapid urbanization; these trends soon became mainstream for other painters too

In literature Realists opposed Romanticism’s emphasis on individual imagination opting instead for an emphasis-centric approach based around scientific observation towards reality itself unlike romantic poetry often highlighting emotions rather than specific events

Realism emerged after political revolutions ended nearly a century-long struggle against monarchies throughout Europe whilst taking advantage upon newly established freedoms granted post-revolutionary stability allowed artist’s creative destinies flourish without fear repercussions felt previously under strict censorship laws set up beforehand

Despite improving access to photo-relic materials and accuracy, photography’s rise during this time period definitely contributed to some problematic scenarios too in keeping with realist goals; while photographing subjects accurately helped provide direction for artists studios and workshops it also represented the challenge facing painters striving towards balancing originality against photorealism which would often result in eerily realistic depictions

Realists worked hard capturing subjects that accurately understood the conditions of the working class live in reality as a protest against capitalism’s increasingly evident exploitation of people laboring away at factories. They paid attention towards showing poverty-stricken homes, inadequate living circumstances experienced by families barely getting through each day which was a reality for some who thought they could find improvements post-revolutionary years.

In conclusion, realism reflected the culture of industrial age because it is intrinsically linked with changes brought about by industrialization. Even though its popularity waned over time amidst technological shifts and pop art movements allowing fresh ideas/voices be recognized equally within our current society’s various conversations. The authenticity lost under mass-consumption culture overrun by machines outpacing human life quality in efforts towards profit above caring for those struggling economically all around us despite technology’s accomplishments through efficiency sometimes valued more than humanity itself remains an issue still amazingly relevant today